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¡Reunión comunitaria 28 de enero!

¡Únase con Truth in Recruitment en el Condado Norte de Santa Barbara el lunes 28 de enero para nuestra primera reunión comunitaria de 2019! Ofreceremos cena, así como la oportunidad de aprender más sobre nuestro trabajo en el norte del condado y sobre cómo podemos continuar apoyando a nuestros jóvenes que se enfrentan a una presión constante para alistarse en las fuerzas armadas con la presencia de reclutadores militares en sus escuelas secundarias.

Si usted es un padre, un estudiante o un miembro de la comunidad, todos son bienvenidos a escuchar las experiencias de los padres y los estudiantes, e identificar los próximos pasos para la organización y sus partidarios.
Información logística:
Donde: 120 E. Jones St., Santa Maria
Hora: 5:30 a 7 pm

¡Esperamos verte ahí!

Zulema Aleman, Coordinadora del Norte del Condado
tirNC@truthinrecruitment.org

North County Community Meeting on 1/28!

Join Truth in Recruitment in North County on Monday, January 28th for our first community meeting of 2019! We will be providing dinner, as well as an opportunity to learn more about our work in North County and how we can continue to support our youth who face constant pressure to enlist by the presence of military recruiters on their high school campuses.

Whether you are a parent, student, or a concerned community members, all are welcome to hear the experiences of parents and students, and identify next steps for the organization and its supporters.

Logistical information:
Where: 120 E. Jones St., Santa Maria
Time: 5:30 to 7 PM

We hope to see you there!

Zulema Aleman, North County Coordinator
tirNC@truthinrecruitment.org

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We are Hiring!

Truth in Recruitment is looking for an enthusiastic and passionate individual who is interested in joining our team part-time (6-8 hours/week) as our paid ($15/hour) community organizer.

It is opened to high school and college students, parents, and veterans who live in the Santa Maria and are bilingual/bicultural.

More information about the internship, organization, and pay rate can be found in the job description here. They are available in English and Spanish.

Applicants should submit a resume that details their relevant work and and cover letter stating their interests and qualifications to Zulema Aleman at zulema.alemann@gmail.com. We ask that applicants state  “Community Organizer Application” in the subject line of the email.

The application deadline is Thursday, February 7th, 2019 at 11:59 PM.

Selective Service Registration

The cover of a booklet published in 1951 by a couple of Army veterans on how to survive after being drafted.

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The National Commission on Military, National, and Public Service is
continuing to work toward recommendations to Congress and the President on
whether draft registration should be ended, extended to women, modified to
include people with skills in special demand by the military (health care,
foreign languages, tech, etc.), and/or replaced with a compulsory national
service scheme with both military and civilian components. More information can be found on Edward Hasbrouck’s website. 

Draft registration ceased entirely from 1975 to 1980, and the Selective Service System was cut back to “deep standby” status with only minimal headquarters staff and no local draft boards. But since 1980, all cis men, and anyone assigned male at birth, US citizens and most cis men and anyone assigned male at birth US residents, have been required to register with the Selective Service System within 30 days of their 18th birthday, and notify the Selective Service System each time they change their residence until their 26th birthday. Draft registration is one of the ways that all cis men and anyone assigned male at birth (and possibly soon cis women and anyone assigned female at birth as well) have to interact with the military and think about their relationship to military “service”.

The Federal government requires that all cis men and anyone assigned male at birth residing in the United States register with the Selective Service System (SSS) during a 60 day period that begins 30 days before their 18th birthday. Although it is not technically conscription, the military draft, it is a list of people who could be called up if the draft were reinstated.

Some people may feel conscientiously opposed to cooperating with draft registration. If you are a conscientious objector whose conscience allows you to register you should go to the post office and fill out the registration card. Write somewhere on the face of the card, between the lines or above your signature, “I’m opposed to participation in war in any form because of my ethical, moral, or religious beliefs,” or words to that effect. You should make a photocopy of the card before surrendering it to the postal clerk. This cannot be done if you register electronically on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form, only if you register by mail with a paper/hard copy.

Here is an article arguing that Why Mandatory National Service is Both Unjust and Unconstitutional by Ilya Somin.

Transgender women are required to register. This link takes you to a Selective Service System page that describes all of those required to register.

More information on SSS registration and Conscientious Objection is available from the Center on Conscience & War, 202-483-2220 | 1830 Connecticut Ave. NW | Washington, DC 20009 | ccw@centeronconscience.org

National Counter Recruitment Strategy Summit in Chicago, June 23-24, 2018.

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As an intern for Truth in Recruitment in Santa Maria, I had the opportunity to attend the National Counter Recruitment Strategy Summit in Chicago with our coordinator, Kate Connell. The summit consisted of learning the history of the counter recruitment movement along with developing goals and strategies that can be implemented by counter recruitment activists. I had the opportunity to work alongside several counter recruitment activists at the summit in breakout sessions. I was not only able to learn a lot from each and every one of them, but was also able to contribute by sharing my own experiences and giving my perspective as part of the youth.

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Taking a part in attending the summit allowed me to have more knowledge on the counter recruitment movement itself and has overall helped me to become more prepared. The goals and tactics that were developed will help face the challenges that may come in the community of Santa Maria. Truth in Recruitment has and will continue to strive to create an impact to the community by working with students, parents, and teachers to make a change happen.

–Selina Perez, Santa Maria High School student and intern.

Difficulties Limiting Recruiters in Santa Barbara Schools—Even with a policy!

Group portrait of TIRand SBUSD

The military has an enormous budget for recruiting and pressuring school districts that limit recruiter visits….Vigilance is necessary. During the school year 2017-18 Truth in Recruitment (TIR) leadership and staff met with Santa Barbara Unified School District (SBUSD) school board members Ismael Ulloa, Wendi Sims-Mooten and Jackie Reid as well as Assistant Superintendent Shawn Carey on four separate occasions. We discussed implementation of the Exhibit 5125.1 Recruiting Activities in the Santa Barbara Unified School District and the continued problem of policy violations.

Two issues took a lot of back and forth with the district to work out — the Opt Out form for release of directory information, and recruiters’ efforts to solicit contact information directly from students:

  • We believe that a recruiter told the SBUSD that they could not give parents a choice on the Opt Out form to check a separate box to opt out only from the military getting a child’s information. Last year the district combined the two as a single opt-out – Colleges/Military. After much research by John Douglas, a retired lawyer and Dos Pueblos HS alumni parent, the district agreed to ‘uncouple’ the choices. We showed them over 20 examples of school districts who gave families an either or choice, including the state of Hawaii, and such cities as Chicago, San Diego, Los Angeles, New York, and San Francisco. The Military Law Task Force and the Project on Youth and Nonmilitary Opportunities also aided this effort.

2017 online registration that combined College/Military in a single opt out:Screen shot SBUSD 2017-18

This year’s, 2018, online registration with Colleges and Military ‘uncoupled’:

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  • The second issue–some SBUSD high schools allowed recruiters to use ‘surveys’ and contact cards to collect student contact information directly from students. Under the federal Every Child Succeeds Act, school districts are only required to give recruiters a student’s name, address and telephone number. These surveys, prominent on the recruiter’s tables, asked for student’s email, GPA, U.S. citizenship status and more, under the guise of finding out their job interests for the military. Such surveys ignore parents’ opt out right to privacy. Recruiters also have handed their phones to students for them to follow each other on Snapchat, Instagram, and Facebook. The military uses social media platforms extensively. After we showed examples of these “surveys” to the administration, they agreed that these violated students’ privacy and the SBUSD policy. If a family “opts-out” they “opt-out.” This will remain an area to monitor.

With the district’s support, TIR parent, students and staff will have annual meetings with all of the SBUSD principals to engage them in implementing the policy and making their staff aware of the recruiter guidelines. We also plan to continue meeting with the school board members and district administration. For our goal of building leadership, we will be working with Parent, Teacher and Student Associations, English Learner Advisory Committees (ELACs), and student clubs.

 

Santa Barbara High School Band Presentation June 4th, 2018

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Lisha and Stephen presented to a class of the Santa Barbara High School Band. There were about a dozen students present, including a mix of gender, race and attitudes toward the military.

After brief introductions, Lisha queries the students about their relationships to military service and feelings about, stressing that we were not there to shame anyone, but rather to invite a frank and honest discussion of the pros and cons or military service as a career or educational life-path.

There was one student present who was in a “pre-enlistment” program of the Navy, and happily announced that she’d be spending the summer training. She also shared that she had encouraged several friends to join her program, but also that she realized that they were probably not going to be getting college educations from the Navy.

In keeping with the TiR materials, we stressed that enlisting is making a large commitment with precious few actual guarantees of when you’ll get in return.

In order to have some discussion of musical careers, Stephen showed several new musical instrument projects he’s undertaken with UCSB students.